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ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting UK - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Use Automapper with ASP.NET MVC Application

clock October 31, 2014 07:38 by author Peter

At this moment, I will show you How to Use Automapper with ASP.NET MVC Application. Automapper could be a convention primarily based object - object mapper. it's offered in GitHub. Here I make a case for about a way to use Automapper to map between domain model objects and think about model objects in ASP.NET MVC applications.  Install Automapper to the project through Nuget.

Consider there's a powerfully typed view that expects a model object of type EmployeeViewModel. thus after querying with the Emplyee model object, we want to map this to EmployeeViewModel object.
public class Employee
   {
      public int EmployeeId { get; set; }
      public string EmployeeName { get; set; }
    }

And my employee view model
public class EmployeeViewModel
    {
        public int EmployeeId { get; set; }
        public string EmployeeName { get; set; }

    }

The use of AutoMapper
AutoMapper is designed within the web project. to form this more maintainable, create a folder (say Mappings) within the solution. Here we will produce 2 profile classes.  One for mapping from domain model object to look at model object and another one for reverse mapping.

public class DomainToViewModelMappingProfile : Profile
    {
        public override string ProfileName
        {
            get { return "DomainToViewModelMappings"; }
        }
        protected override void Configure()
        {
            Mapper.CreateMap<Employee, EmployeeViewModel>();
        }
    }
public class ViewModelToDomainMappingProfile : Profile
    {
        public override string ProfileName
        {
            get { return "ViewModelToDomainMappings"; }
        }
        protected override void Configure()
        {
            Mapper.CreateMap<EmployeeViewModel, Employee>();
        }
    }

Now create a configuration class within Mappings folder.
public class AutoMapperConfiguration
    {
        public static void Configure()
        {
            Mapper.Initialize(x =>
            {
                x.AddProfile<DomainToViewModelMappingProfile>();
                x.AddProfile<ViewModelToDomainMappingProfile>();
            });
        }
    }

And then call this configuration from global.asax.
AutoMapperConfiguration.Configure();

And from the controller simply map the employeeObject (domain model object) to employeeViewModelObject (view model object).
var employeeViewModelObject = Mapper.Map<Employee, EmployeeViewModel>(employeeObject);

In advanced situation we will even customise the configuration. for instance we will map a specific property from source to destination.
Mapper.CreateMap<X, XViewModel>()
.ForMember(x => x.Property1, opt => opt.MapFrom(source => source.PropertyXYZ));

Automapper provides extremely an improved and straightforward way to map between objects.



ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting UK - HostForLIFE.eu :: Using the ASP.NET MVC 5 Filter Overrides Feature

clock October 28, 2014 09:04 by author Peter

In the previous post we took a glance at the new authentication filter and its strong points. There's an extra new filter that has been free with ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting that was requested by several developers out their over a protracted time. This can be the new filter override feature! Within the previous versions of MVC, there was no thanks to override a filter for simply one action or controller. What you had to do is to use the filter for every and each action and controller one by one and this was an enormous waste of development time. Rather than doing this developers found ways to implement filter overrides using workaround. But usually the usage of workarounds cause the lack of code consistency. Therefore as an answer for this, Filter Overrides feature was introduced in MVC 5.

Filter Overrides in action

Imagine a situation where you want to exclude a globally applied authorization filter just only for a single action method. This was one thing you may not implement easily with the previous versions of MVC. however now the MVC 5 Filter Overrides feature provides you this capability with few lines of code. Lets have a glance at the following code snippet:

[Authorize(Users = "Admin")]
public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }
    public ActionResult About()
    {
        ViewBag.Message = "Your application description page.";
        return View();
    }
    public ActionResult Contact()
    {
        ViewBag.Message = "Your contact page.";
        return View();
    }
}

As you'll see AuthorizeAttribute has been embellished to the HomeController class with the user ‘Admin’. so it applies to all or any the actions within the controller. Assume you would like to bypass this filter only for the ‘About’ action. you would like to provide access to ‘About’ page just for user ‘Peter’ only. In MVC 5 you'll achieve this by adding 2 lines of code as illustrated in the following code snip.

 

OK. That’s it. currently all the actions inside the home Controller will only be accessed by ‘Admin’ except the ‘About’ action. The ‘About’ action is merely accessible for ‘Peter’. therefore now you'll get eliminate the headache of applying filters for every and each action wherever you would like to exclude only one or 2 actions.

There are 5 kinds of override filters accessible for every of filter types:

  1.     OverrideActionFilters
  2.     OverrideAuthentication
  3.     OverrideAuthorization
  4.     OverrideExceptionFilters
  5.     OverrideResultFilters

You will use the relevant override filters where is required.

Filter Override Bug Workaround

For making a bug workaround you'll have to do some of things:
Implement a custom class that may inherit from the action filter that you just wish to override and implement the IOverrideFilter. You’ll have to implement the FiltersToOverride property wherever you have got to identify the filters that you wish to override. for example lets create an easy workaround for the instance that has been described above:
public class MyOverrideAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute, IOverrideFilter
{
    public Type FiltersToOverride
    {
        get
        {
            return typeof(IAuthorizationFilter);
        }
    }
}

Then, the Controller implementation will change to:
[Authorize(Users = "Admin")]
public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View();
    }
    [MyOverrideAuthorize(Users = "Peter")]
    public ActionResult About()
    {
        ViewBag.Message = "Your application description page.";
        return View();
    }
    public ActionResult Contact()
    {
        ViewBag.Message = "Your contact page.";
        return View();
    }
}



European ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting - UK :: Tips Improving Your ASP.NET MVC Codebase

clock October 27, 2014 10:05 by author Scott

Some of you sometimes think why your application eat up until 1 GB-2GB memory on production server. After looking through the code, doing some profiling, maybe shaking your head a bit, you've figured out what the issue is and now you need to give some feedback.

In this tutorial, I will show some tips that you can follow to reduce your memory usage on production server and keep your ASP.NET MVC codebase working as you’d expect.

1. Understand the queries in your problem domain

The root cause of the support ticket I received was a simple case of fetching too much data from the database, causing obscene amounts of memory usage.

It's a common enough issue. You're building a simple blog, it has posts and it has media (images, videos, attachments). You put a Media array onto your Post domain object. Your Media domain object has all the image data stored in a byte array. Since you're using an ORM, there's a certain way you need to design your domain model to play nice; we've all experienced this.

public class BlogPost {
    public ICollection<BlogMedia> Media { get; set; }
}
public class BlogMedia {
    public byte[] Data { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

There's nothing absolutely wrong with this design. You've modeled your domain accurately. The problem is, when you issue a query through your favorite ORM, it eagerly loads all the data associated with your blog post:

public IList<BlogPost> GetNewestPosts(int take) {
    return _db.BlogPosts.OrderByDescending(p => p.PostDate).Take(take).ToList();
}

A seemingly innocuous line (unless you've been bitten), a sneaky monster is lying in wait with big consequences if you haven't disabled lazy loading or didn't tell your ORM to ignore that big Data property on blog media.

It's important to understand how your ORM queries and maps objects and make sure you only query what you need (for example using projection).

public IList<PostSummary> GetNewestPosts(int take) {
    return _db.BlogPosts.OrderByDescending(p => p.PostDate).Take(take).Select(p => new PostSummary() {
        Title = p.Title,
        Id = p.Id
    }).ToList();
}

This ensures we only grab the amount of data we really need for the task.

It's OK to have more than 5 methods on a repository; be as granular as you need to be for your UI.

2. Don't call your repositories from your views

Consider this line in an MVC view:

@foreach(var post in Model.RelatedPosts) {
    ...
}

It seems innocent enough. But if we take a look at what exactly that model property is hiding:

public class MyViewModel {

    public IList<BlogPost> RelatedPosts {
        get { return new BlogRepository().GetRelatedPosts(this.Tags); }
    }

}

Your "view model" has business logic in it on top of calling a data access method directly. Now you've introduced data access code somewhere it doesn't belong and hidden it inside a property. Move that into the controller so you can wrangle it in and populate the view model conciously.

This is a good opportunity to point out that implementing proper unit tests would uncover issues like this; because you definitely can't intercept calls to something like that and then you'd realize injecting a repository into a view model is probably not something you want to be doing.

3. Use partials and child actions to your advantage

If you need to perform business logic in a view, that should be a sign you need to revisit your view model and logic. I don't think it's advisable to do this in your MVC Razor view:

@{
    var blogController = new BlogController();
}

<ul>
@foreach(var tag in blogController.GetTagsForPost(p.Id)) {
    <li>@tag.Name</li>
}
</ul>

Putting business logic in the view is a no-no, but on top of that you're creating acontroller! Move that into your action method and use that view model you made for what it's intended for. You can also move that logic into a separate action method that only gets called inside views so you can cache it separately if needed.

//In the controller:

[ChildActionOnly]
[OutputCache(Duration=2000)]
public ActionResult TagsForPost(int postId) {
    return View();
}

//In the view:

@{Html.RenderAction("TagsForPost", new { postId = p.Id });}

Notice the ChildActionOnly attribute. From MSDN:

Any method that is marked with ChildActionOnlyAttribute can be called only with the Action or RenderAction HTML extension methods.

This means people can't see your child action by manipulating the URL (if you're using the default route).

Partial views and child actions are useful tools in the MVC arsenal; use them to your advantage!

4. Cache what matters

Given the code smells above, what do you think will happen if you only cached your view model?

public ActionResult Index() {
    var homepageViewModel = HttpContext.Current.Cache["homepageModel"] as HomepageViewModel;

    if (homepageViewModel == null) {
        homepageViewModel = new HomepageViewModel();
        homepageViewModel.RecentPosts = _blogRepository.GetNewestPosts(5);

        HttpContext.Current.Cache.Add("homepageModel", homepageViewModel, ...);

    }

    return View(homepageViewModel);
}

Nothing! There will not be any performance gain because you're accessing the data layer through a controller variable in the view and through a property in the view model... caching the view model won't help anything.

Instead, consider caching the output of the MVC action instead:

[OutputCache(Duration=2000)]
public ActionResult Index() {
    var homepageViewModel = new HomepageViewModel();

    homepageViewModel.RecentPosts = _blogRepository.GetNewestPosts(5);

    return View(homepageViewModel);
}

Notice the handy OutputCache attribute. MVC supports ASP.NET Output Caching; use it to your advantage when it applies. If you are going to cache the model, your model needs to essentially be a POCO with automatic (and read-only) properties... not something that calls other repository methods.

Conclusion

I hope with tutorial above, it will help you to minimize your memory usage on the server.

 



ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting UK - HostForLIFE.eu :: How to Easily Add ASP.NET MVC Anti-Forgery Tokens to any or all Post Requests

clock October 24, 2014 07:35 by author Peter

Today, I will show you How to Easily Add ASP.NET MVC 5 Anti-Forgery Tokens to any or all Post Requests. One of the newer attacks against web applications is that the cross-site request forgery attack. It’s an attack against modern applications that store a cookie to represent the presently logged in user. The matter has been explained in different websites.

One of the techniques to stop this attack is to add an anti-forgery token using the @Html.AntiForgeryToken extension technique. On the controller side, the action technique defines the [ValidateAntiForgeryToken] attribute. Behind the scenes, the hidden input field for the anti-forgery token is valid by the ASP.NET MVC  5 framework to confirm it’s correct. Whereas there's discussion as to whether or not this approach is required only for the logging in an anonymous posts, or all posts in general, as been up for debate. However the purpose of CSRF is to attack authenticated users.
public class GlobalAntiForgeryTokenAttribute
  : FilterAttribute, IAuthorizationFilter
{
  public sub OnAuthorization(filterContext As AuthorizationContext)
  {
                if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request.HttpMethod.ToUpper() == "POST")
                {
                  AntiForgery.Validate();
    }         
  }
}

On authorization of the request, if the operation may be a POST request, we tend to call the Validate() method on the AntiForgery helper to actually perform the validation. All of our post operations are currently checked for forgery; but, this can fail as a result of we haven’t added our token globally. To do that, we've to create a custom form extension method just like the following:

public static void FormExtensions
{
   public static MvcForm BeginDataForm(this HtmlHelper html, string action, string controller, ...)
  {
     var form = html.BeginForm(action, controller, ...);
                 //At this point, the form markup is rendered in BeginForm
                 // we can render the token       
                 //With every form, we render a token, since this
                 //assumes all forms are posts
                 html.ViewContext.Writer.Write(html.AntiForgeryToken().ToHtmlString());
                return form;
   }
}

If we use our custom helper for all of our forms, then all of our custom forms can have rendered an anti-forgery token. so we don’t have to worry about making it ourselves, saving time and reducing code.



ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting UK - HostForLIFE.eu :: RegularExpression Validation Using Annotations in ASP.NET MVC 5

clock October 21, 2014 11:34 by author Peter

We can do Regular Expression or REGEX validation using Annotations in ASP.NET MVC 5. we can use "RegularExpression" attribute for validation. during this attribute we specify Regular Expression string. We can also specify our custom error messages for that we'd like to set "ErrorMessage" Property in "RegularExpression" attribute. Here is the example for this.

We take "Email" Address validation using REGEX. If user enter email address, which isn't in correct format at that time our validation message display on screen.
[RegularExpression(@"[A-Za-z0-9._%+-][email protected][A-Za-z0-9.-]+\.[A-Za-z]{2,4}",
        ErrorMessage="Email Address is not in proper format.")]
        public string Email { get; set; }

At the view side , add this code:
  @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Email)
        @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Email,"", new {  style="color:red"})

Here is Code for this. Model (Customer.cs):

public class Customer
    {
        public int CustomerID { get; set; }
        [Required]
        [StringLength(20,MinimumLength=2)]
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        [StringLength(10)]
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        [RegularExpression(@"[A-Za-z0-9._%+-][email protected][A-Za-z0-9.-]+\.[A-Za-z]{2,4}",
        ErrorMessage="Email Address is not in proper format.")]
       public string Email { get; set; }
    }



European ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting - UK :: Using Bootstrap 3 in ASP.NET MVC 5

clock October 21, 2014 10:00 by author Scott

In this article, we will describe about ASP.NET MVC 5 uses Bootstrap 3 as the CSS framework. You can check our last article about asp.net mvc 5 scaffolding.

Get Started with ASP.NET MVC 5

When you create a new ASP.NET MVC 5 Web Application in Visual Studio 2013 it is using Bootstrap 3 as its default CSS Framework. You get the pleasure of the responsive navigation and website along with all the typography and other bells and whistles you expect from Bootstrap 3.

Inside the ASP.NET MVC 5 Website Template you will find the bootstrap.css and bootstrap.min.css stylesheets as well as the bootstrap.js and bootstrap.min.js scripts. The _Layout.cshtml view and other views are marked up appropriately using the CSS selectors in Bootstrap 3.

ASP.NET MVC 5 Bootstrap

By default, the ASP.NET MVC Website Template uses a couple of bundles that use both Bootstrap 3 CSS as well as Modernizr. Check out the Layout.cshtml view to see the use of two of the bundles.

  @Styles.Render("~/Content/css")
 
@Scripts.Render("~/bundles/modernizr")

You will find these bundles configured in the BundleConfig.cs file in App_Start.

  bundles.Add(new ScriptBundle("~/bundles/modernizr").Include(
    
"~/Scripts/modernizr-*"
));

  bundles
.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/css").Include(
    
"~/Content/bootstrap.css"
,
    
"~/Content/site.css"
));

And, of course, the CSS selectors and markup in the new ASP.NET MVC 5 Views are based on Bootstrap 3.

That’s only brief tutorial about ASP.NET MVC 5. We will be back with new tutorial again.

 

 



ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting UK - HostForLIFE.eu :: Session Handling for Synchronous/Asynchronous Requests in ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting with jQuery

clock October 17, 2014 07:34 by author Peter

Basic use of session in ASP.NET MVC 5 is as follows:

  • Check user is logged in or not
  • to carry authorization data of user logged in
  • to carry temporary alternative data
  • Check session Timeout on user action for every controller

Using asynchronous (AJAX) request it's a very common state of affairs to use jquery AJAX or unobtrusive AJAX API of ASP.NET MVC 5 to create asynchronous request in MVC 5. Each jquery AJAX and unobtrusive AJAX square measure very powerful to handle asynchronous mechanism. however in most things, we like better to use jquery AJAX to possess fine tuned control over the application. And currently suppose we wish to see the session timeout for every asynchronous call in our application. we are using JSON to grab an information on form and send it with asynchronous request. Therefore we dropped in situation where:

1. Normal direct won’t work well
RedirectToAction("LoginView", "LoginController");

2. We need to ascertain session timeout in action technique. A repetitive code in every action method therefore reduced code reusability and maintainability.

if (session.IsNewSession || Session["LoginUser"] == null) { //redirection logic 

We can use base controller class or take advantage of action filters of ASP.NET MVC 5. using base controller class and preponderant OnActionExecuting methodology of Controller class:
public class MyBaseController : Controller

{

    protected override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)

   {

        HttpSessionStateBase session = filterContext.HttpContext.Session;
        if (session.IsNewSession || Session["LoginUser"] == null)

        {

            filterContext.Result = Json("Session Timeout", "text/html");

        }

   }

}

And inheriting Base Class:

public class MyController : BaseController

{

//your action methods…

}

Limitation of this approach is that it covers up every action method.Using action filter attribute class of ASP.NET MVC 5. Therefore we will fine tune every controller action as needed.
      [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class |

    AttributeTargets.Method, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = true)]

     public class SessionTimeoutFilterAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute

     {
   
       public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)

    {

       HttpSessionStateBase session = filterContext.HttpContext.Session;

        // If the browser session or authentication session has expired

        if (session.IsNewSession || Session["LoginUser"] == null)

        {

            if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAjaxRequest())

            {

                
JsonResult result = Json("SessionTimeout", "text/html");
                filterContext.Result = result;

            }

            else

            {

                // For round-trip requests,

               filterContext.Result = new RedirectToRouteResult(

                new RouteValueDictionary {

                { "Controller", "Accounts" },

                { "Action", "Login" }

                });

            }

        }

        base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);

    }

}


Jquery code at client side

$.ajax({

    type: "POST",

    url: "controller/action",

    contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",

    dataType: "json",

    data: JSON.stringify(data),

    async: true,

    complete: function (xhr, status) {

            if (xhr.responseJSON == CONST_SESSIONTIMEOUT) {

                RedirectToLogin(true);

                return false;

            }

            if (status == 'error' || !xhr.responseText) {

                alert(xhr.statusText);

            }

       }

    });




European HostForLIFE.eu Proudly Launches PrestaShop 1.6 Hosting

clock October 16, 2014 09:20 by author Peter

HostForLIFE.eu, a leading Windows web hosting provider with innovative technology solutions and a dedicated professional services team, today announced the support for PrestaShop 1.6 Hosting plan due to high demand of PrestaShop 1.6 users in Europe. HostForLIFE.eu hosts its servers in top class data centers that is located in Amsterdam, London and Seattle (US) to guarantee 99.9% network uptime. All data center feature redundancies in network connectivity, power, HVAC, security, and fire suppression. All hosting plans from HostForLIFE.eu include 24×7 support and 30 days money back guarantee.

PrestaShop 1.6 is a free and open-source e-commerce web application, committed to providing the best shopping cart experience for both merchants and customers. It is written in PHP, is highly customizable, supports all the major payment services, is translated in many languages and localized for many countries, is fully responsive (both front- and back-office), etc. PrestaShop 1.6 offers new and improved navigation elements making navigating your online shop easier and more effective than ever.

PrestaShop 1.6 presents a comprehensive, intuitive user administration panel, and gives you hundreds of standard functions that can be adapted or personalized in order to respond to all of customer needs. The front office template on PrestaShop 1.6 is now mobile responsive, allowing customer online shop to display perfectly when accessed from a mobile and tablet device.

At the forefront of the latest innovative web technology, PrestaShop 1.6 integrates with Bootstrap 3.0, FontAwesome, Sass Compass and D3 Data Driven Documents. Online Shopping has never been so technologically brilliant. A unique e-commerce feature you will only find in PrestaShop 1.6, Net Profit Margin is automatically updated in real-time.

Further information and the full range of features PrestaShop 1.6 Hosting can be viewed here http://hostforlife.eu/European-PrestaShop-16-Hosting

About HostForLIFE.eu
HostForLIFE.eu is an European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on the Windows Platform only. HostForLIFE.eu deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes.

HostForLIFE.eu is awarded Top No#1 SPOTLIGHT Recommended Hosting Partner by Microsoft (see http://www.microsoft.com/web/hosting/HostingProvider/Details/953). Their service is ranked the highest top #1 spot in several European countries, such as: Germany, Italy, Netherlands, France, Belgium, United Kingdom, Sweden, Finland, Switzerland and other European countries. Besides this award, they have also won several awards from reputable organizations in the hosting industry and the detail can be found on their official website.



European ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting - UK :: ASP.NET MVC 5 Scaffolding

clock October 13, 2014 07:28 by author Scott

In this article, I will show you how to use Scaffolding With your ASP.net MVC 5 Application. I assume that you all know about scaffolding and I don’t need to explain it again. In our previous post, we have also explained about Scaffolding with the Repository Pattern in ASP.NET MVC 3.

In this article, we will be more focus in adding scaffolded item to ASP.net MVC 5.

1. Let's create an ASP.net MVC 5 web application in Visual Studio 2013 and name it as ScaffoldingMVC5.

2. Right click your Controllers folder and Add New Scaffolded Item is as below.

3. From the Add Scaffold window, select the MVC 5 Controller with views,using Entity Framework scaffold template.

4. Add a controller. Please see the below screenshot

Then, please fill a name for your Data context as below, for example DataContext

5. You have done great job and this is the result

Testing the Result

Index Page

Create Page

Details Page

Edit Page

Delete Page

All above CRUD operations were generated according to our Model class Pet.

Pet.cs

Key points of the above code

  • [ScaffoldColumn(false)] means,the property which it declared will not use for scaffolding.In other words, that property will not be shown on the UI (i.e. Created property will not be shown).
  • Data validations of the form elements are happening ,according to the above model's Data Annotation values.
  • Let's explore it.

If you click the Create button, without entering anything.What will happen ?

What if you try to enter a wrong data type ?

 


Calender has been shown, if it's a DateTime property.

Great, right?



ASP.NET MVC 6 Hosting - HostForLIFE.eu :: Updating Multiple Row Using ASP.NET MVC and Entity Framework

clock October 7, 2014 12:11 by author Peter

In this post we are going to update multiple row using ASP.NET MVC and Entity Framework.  Just follow these steps below:
1. First we need to create a project.
Go to Menu File > New > Project > Select ASP.NET MVC web application > Entry Application Name > Click OK.


2. Add a Database.
Go to Solution Explorer > Right Click on App_Data folder > Add > New item > Select SQL Server Database Under Data > Enter Database name > Add. 
Open Database and add a table for update operation. Here I am creating a table called Contacts.

3. Add Entity Data Model.
Go to Solution Explorer > Right Click on Project Name from Solution Explorer folder > Add > New item > Select ADO.net Entity Data Model under data > Enter model name > Add.
A popup window will come (Entity Data Model Wizard) > Select Generate from database > Next > Chose your data connection > select your database > next > Select tables > enter Model Namespace > Finish.

After Creating Data model, we have to modify our generated entity(table) for Apply validation for required fields.

Here we need to modify contact.cs fileOpen file and modify as for enable validation.
namespace UpdateMultiRecord
{
    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
    public partial class Contac
  {
        [Required]        
        public int ContactID { get; set; }
        [Required]
        public string ContactPerson { get; set; }       
 [Required]
        public string Contactno { get; set; }
        public string EmailID { get; set; }
    }
}


Here I am using Home controller index action.

Get Action      
[HttpGet]
        public ActionResult Index()
        {
            List<Contact> model = new List<Contact>();
            using (MyDatabaseEntities dc = new MyDatabaseEntities())
            {
                model = dc.Contacts.ToList();
            }
            return View(model);

        }     
Post Action       
 [HttpPost]
        public ActionResult Index(List<Contact> list)
        {
           if (ModelState.IsValid)
           {
               using (MyDatabaseEntities dc = new MyDatabaseEntities())
                {
                    foreach (var i in list)
                    {

                        var c = dc.Contacts.Where(a =>                                  
                        a.ContactID.Equals(i.ContactID)).FirstOrDefault();
                        if (c != null)
                        {
                            c.ContactPerson = i.ContactPerson;
                            c.Contactno = i.Contactno;
                            c.EmailID = i.EmailID;
                        }
                    }
                    dc.SaveChanges();
                }
                ViewBag.Message = "Successfully Updated.";
                return View(list);
            }
            else
            {
               ViewBag.Message = "Failed ! Please try again.";
                return View(list);
            }
        }       
Create View for Update Multiple Row.
@model List<UpdateMultiRecord.Contact>
@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Update multiple row at once Using MVC 4 and EF ";
}
@using (@Html.BeginForm("Index","Home", FormMethod.Post))
{
    <table>
            <tr>
                <th></th>               
                <th>Contact Person</th>
                <th>Contact No</th>
                <th>Email ID</th>
            </tr>
        @for (int i = 0; i < Model.Count; i++)
        {
            <tr>               
                <td> @Html.HiddenFor(model => model[i].ContactID)</td>
                <td>@Html.EditorFor(model => model[i].ContactPerson)</td>
                <td>@Html.EditorFor(model => model[i].Contactno)</td>
                <td>@Html.EditorFor(model => model[i].EmailID)</td>
            </tr>
        }
    </table>
    <p><input type="submit" value="Save" /></p>
    <p style="color:green; font-size:12px;">
        @ViewBag.Message
    </p>
}
 @section Scripts
     {@Scripts.Render("~/bundles/jqueryval")}

Code: @Scripts.Render("~/bundles/jqueryval") will enable client side validation. Finally, Run Application. Edit Contact Details and Click Save button.



About HostForLIFE.eu

HostForLIFE.eu is European Windows Hosting Provider which focuses on Windows Platform only. We deliver on-demand hosting solutions including Shared hosting, Reseller Hosting, Cloud Hosting, Dedicated Servers, and IT as a Service for companies of all sizes.

We have offered the latest Windows 2012 Hosting, ASP.NET 4.5 Hosting, ASP.NET MVC 5 Hosting, and SQL 2014 Hosting.


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